December 16, 2014

From our Nutritionists’ Table

To avoid holiday pounds, arm yourself with a game plan 

The holiday dinners, the eggnog, the gifts of chocolate – let’s face it, temptations are lurking around every corner during the holiday season. With obesity on the rise, you may be wondering how to make the right choices during this busy time of the year.

December 11, 2014

Do you really have time for the flu?

This may be a year to remember when it comes to the flu. The Cook County Department of Public Health reports that the flu has hit earlier and harder than in the last two years. And a flu outbreak prompted one La Grange Park high school to close for a few days this week.

Loyola Medicine has seen a jump in the number of flu cases over the past few weeks. Loyola physicians last week recorded 76 confirmed cases of the flu, nearly double the number of cases seen during last season’s peak week. (To see current Loyola, Cook County, Illinois and U.S. flu statistics, check out Loyola Flu Central.)

One concern is that a flu strain that was predicted to hit the U.S. – the H3N2 virus – has mutated slightly since the flu vaccine was formulated. Loyola physicians and public health officials, however, are urging people to get the flu shot because it still will lessen the severity of symptoms of the mutated strain and completely protect against the other predicted flu strains.

November 25, 2014

Don’t get burned while frying a turkey

Is Thanksgiving dinner a recipe for disaster? Thanksgiving Day has more than double the number of home cooking fires than an average day, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. More than 4,000 fires occur annually on Thanksgiving as families deep-fry turkeys, boil potatoes and bake pies, all with children underfoot.

“Splashes, spills, slips, burns and cuts are just a few of the many cooking hazards that occur during the Thanksgiving meal preparation,” said Arthur Sanford, MD, burn surgeon at Loyola University Health System. “Adults doing the cooking are often injured but sadly children often also get into harm’s way.”

November 24, 2014

Top heart surgeon Ed McGee, MD, joins Loyola

Internationally known cardiothoracic surgeon Ed McGee, MD, is joining Loyola University Medical Center as head of the heart transplant and assist device program.

Loyola’s cardiothoracic transplant team is greatly enhanced with the additional expertise of Dr. McGee. Previously, he was surgical director of heart transplantation and mechanical assistance at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

November 17, 2014

How to live well and live with diabetes

Diabetes, which affects more than 20 million Americans, can be thought of as being as corrosive to one’s health as rust is to a car. In many cases it doesn’t take long before the damage has a permanent effect. However, with education and disease management people can live long, productive lives. In this video, José Rodriguez talks about how determination and help from Loyola’s Living Well with Diabetes program turned around his health.

October 29, 2014

Avoid the fright of landing in the ER on Halloween

The thrills and chills of Halloween should be from trick-or-treating or during a trip to the haunted house. Overlooking some details, however, could mean a trip to the scariest place of all – the ER.

“Nothing is scarier than a trip to the emergency room,” said Mark Cichon, DO, chair, Department of Emergency Medicine at Loyola University Health System. “In a season devoted to frights, it is our goal to keep everyone safe.”

October 27, 2014

From our Nutritionists’ Table

Shopping strategy leads to healthier eating

One of the most important steps in eating a healthy, balanced diet is your trip to the grocery store. Being prepared before you head out is imperative. Two tips to live by are: 1.) Try to shop when you AREN’T hungry so you don’t give in to impulse purchases, which can also put you over your budget. And 2.) Decide what meals you plan to prepare in the next few days and create a list before you leave the house. If you go in with a plan, you are much more likely to stick with it.

October 17, 2014

Scary part of Halloween is in the trick-or-treat bag

For most kids Halloween is all about the candy. It is estimated that each child’s bag of goodies contains about 4,800 calories, has 3 cups of sugar and 1½ cups of fat. The real horror in the Halloween trick-or-treat bag is how it adds to an already scary epidemic of childhood obesity.

“Kids and teens love Halloween. It’s filled with fun parties, costumes and free candy. Halloween can be a great time as long as parents make sure their child doesn’t go overboard eating all that candy,” said Garry Sigman, MD, director of the Pediatric Weight Management Program at Loyola University Health System.